Difference between revisions of "Nevada"

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== [[File:VotingRights.png | left | 50px | Voting Rights | link= ]] Voting Rights ==
 
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Nevada adopted online voter registration in 2010 [http://www.brennancenter.org/analysis/vrm-states-nevada]. In October 2016, two Native American tribes in Nevada have won an emergency court order in a federal lawsuit accusing the Republican secretary of state and two counties of discriminating against them under the Voting Rights Act.[http://www.reviewjournal.com/politics/election-2016/us-judge-sides-nevada-tribes-voting-rights-case]. Nevada law also allows for private citizens to challenge the eligibility of other voters inside polling locations and places the burden of proof on the person who is challenged.[https://lasvegassun.com/news/2016/nov/04/random-citizens-can-contest-your-voting-right-in-n/]
  
 
== [[File:Incarceration.png | left | 50px | Mass Incarceration | link= ]] Mass Incarceration ==
 
== [[File:Incarceration.png | left | 50px | Mass Incarceration | link= ]] Mass Incarceration ==

Revision as of 15:24, 29 January 2017


Updates
Updates

Elected Officials
Elected Officials

2016 Election Results for Nevada

United States Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (Democrat)

U.S. Representative, District 4 Ruben Kihuen (Democrat)

State Senate, District 6 Nicole Cannizzaro (Democrat)

State Senate, District 15 Heidi S. Gansert (Republican)


Current Nevada Clark County Elected Officials

Governor Brian Sandoval (Republican)

  • 4 year term expires in 2018

Lieutenant Governor Mark Hutchison (Republican)

  • 4 year term expires in 2018

Secretary of State Barbara K. Cegavske (Republican)

  • 4 year term expires in 2018

State Treasurer Dan Schwartz (Republican)

  • 4 year term expires in 2018

State Controller Ron Knecht (Republican)

  • 4 year term expires in 2018

Attorney General Adam Paul Laxalt (Republican)

  • 4 year terms expires in 2018


Key Upcoming Elections
Key Upcoming Elections

Obamacare / link=
Obamacare / ACA

If there is a full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, 264,000 people in Nevada (or 9.1% of the population) are estimated to lose coverage, whereas 371,000 people (or 12.8% of the population) will lose coverage with a partial repeal. (Retrieved 1/28/2017 from ACA Repeal Impact, state-by-state.) This is because with a full repeal, premiums will not increase the way they would under a partial repeal, since insurance companies will be able to discriminate on the basis of preexisting conditions and won't be required to provide essential health benefits.[1] Not covering preexisting conditions will disproportionately affect people with disabilities.

The number of uninsured people in Nevada by 2021 is predicted to be 408,000 under the ACA. Without the ACA, that number is expected to rise to 748,000, a 83.3% increase.[2]

Prior to the ACA's ban on gender-rating, women in Nevada could pay up to 45% more for the same coverage, compared to men; an ACA repeal could bring back that coverage gap.[3]

Nevada is among the many states that lost the ability to place lifetime limits on coverage, because that practice is banned by the ACA; those limits are likely to be reinstated under a full repeal.[4]

Republican Senator Dean Heller is up for reelection in 2018 and voted to repeal the ACA with no replacement.[5]

Policing
Policing

The Facts

  • 69 people have been killed by police in the state of Nevada from 2013 through 2016 [6].
  • 13% of the people killed by police were black.
  • Reno Police Department has a homicide rate of 35.52 for all people, and 333.9 for black people. North Las Vegas Police Department has a homicide rate of 23.05 for all people, and 48.1 for black people. Henderson Police Department has a homicide rate of 19.40 for all people, and 0 for black people. Las Vegas Police Department has a homicide rate of 14.30 for all people, and 48.4 for black people. [7].

Immigration
Immigration

The Facts

  • There are 210,000 undocumented immigrants part of Nevada’s total population of 2,633,000, which makes up 8% of the population.

[8]

  • If legalized, wages in Nevada would increase to $970,000 and would create 23,000 jobs [9]
  • In 2012, immigrants paid $12 billion in state and local taxes. [10]
  • Immigrants pay $3.2 billion in taxes to state [11]
  • Immigrants earn 18% less in wages than legal workers. [12]

Rights of Non-Citizens

  • Nevada allows undocumented immigrants to obtain a passport with a passport, birth certificate or evidence of current status in the country

.[13]

  • Nevada does not grant undocumented immigrants any in-state tuition benefits. [14] It is one of the states leading with the most to sign up for DACA. By 2014, 10,564 people applied for DACA and 9,243 were approved. [15]. Truckee Meadows Community College awards a DACA grant to students who have obtained a I-797 and Social Security Card. The Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship, and in-state tution are other forms of non-federal aid available to DACA Nevada students who complete high school. [16] In 2015, Governor Brian Sandoval signed the AB27 bill allowing resident with temporary legal status to teach in Nevada. [17]
  • In 2012 President Barack Obama signed an executive order (DACA) that defers deportation for children who were brought to the country as children, the action allows them to work lawfully but does not create a pathway to citizenship or give them legal status in the United States. [18]

Deportation

The Facts

  • Nevada has 190,000 undocumented immigrants making up 7% of the total population. There are 263,000 foreign-born residents in state all together. [19]
  • An estimated 128,000 of undocumented immigrants were working, providing $7.8 billion in tax revenue and $13.3 billion in productivity. [20]
  • If all undocumented immigrants were deported, total wages in Nevada would decrease by $7.8 billion. [21]
  • Should the state comply with the mass deportation, Nevada will lose $1.3 billion in employee compensation [22]
  • If employers are able to fill 15% of the vacancies, the state will still lose $1.2 billion. [23]

Policy

  • Nevada abides by the “Secure Communities” program, in which in the place of an arrest the police must take fingerprints and run background checks. [24]
  • By 2015, Las Vegas police did not consider the city to be a “sanctuary city,” but did join other cities and counties in stopping cooperation with detainers and notifications. A process by which law enforcement is inquired by the ICE about information on inmates and detain them for 48 hours. [25]
  • Between, 2008 to 2011, 6,848 detainers were issued for prisoners in the Clark County Detention center.[26]

Sanctuary Policies

  • Las Vegas is the one city in Nevada that is described as a "sanctuary city".[27] The term sanctuary city is used to describe places that limit how much they help federal law enforcement (usually ICE) with removals (also known as deportations).

Refugee Resettlement

  • Between October 2016 to December 2016, 241 refugees were estimated to have arrived in Nevada [28]

Voting Rights
Voting Rights

Nevada adopted online voter registration in 2010 [29]. In October 2016, two Native American tribes in Nevada have won an emergency court order in a federal lawsuit accusing the Republican secretary of state and two counties of discriminating against them under the Voting Rights Act.[30]. Nevada law also allows for private citizens to challenge the eligibility of other voters inside polling locations and places the burden of proof on the person who is challenged.[31]

Mass Incarceration
Mass Incarceration

The Facts

  • In 2014, Nevada incarcerated 19,225 people, with a probation population of 12,102 and parole population of 5,522.
  • 0 people are incarcerated in private prisons in Nevada.
  • 591 juveniles are in custody in Nevada.
  • Of the prison population, 2,719 people were serving life sentences, and 491 were serving life sentences without parole.
  • In Nevada, a black person is 4.1 times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person.
  • Corrections Expenditures in 2014 were $286 million. [32]

Tax Cuts for the Wealthy
Tax Cuts for the Wealthy

Housing/Infrastructure
Housing/Infrastructure

Women's Rights/Reproductive Justice
Women's Rights/Reproductive Justice

LGBTQ Issues / link=
LGBTQ Issues

Educational Justice
Educational Justice

Consumer Protections /Worker's Rights
Consumer Protections /Worker's Rights

Facts

Policies

  • Nevada has a minimum wage of $8.25 without health benefits; $7.25 with health benefits.[33]
  • Nevada has no state law for paid sick leave.[34]
  • Nevada has no state law for paid family leave.[35]
  • Nevada is a state with an at-will exemption.[36] At-will means that an employer can terminate an employee at any time for any reason, except an illegal one, or for no reason without breaking the law.[37] Likewise, an employee is free to leave a job at any time for any or no reason with no adverse legal consequences[38].
  • Nevada also has a public policy exemption[39] meaning that an employer may not fire an employee if it would violate the state's public policy doctrine or a state or federal statute including refusing to perform an act that state law prohibits (ex: refusing an employer's request to commit perjury at a trial), reporting a violation of the law (ex: reporting an employer's fraudulent accounting practices or use of child labor), engaging in acts that are in the public interest (joining the National Guard or performing jury duty) and exercising a statutory right (ex. filing a claim under the state workers' compensation law).[40]
  • Nevada does allow for implied contract exemptions[41]. An implied contract can be created in several different ways: oral assurances by a supervisor or handbooks, policies or practices as written assurances by the employer. This means that if there is no written contract between the employer and employee, that employee may have an exception of fixed term or even indefinite employment based on an employer's statements.[42] As a general rule, courts disregard language promising long-term, lifetime or permanent employment as aspirational and consider the relationship to be at-will.[43]
  • Nevada does support the Implied Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing[44]. Courts have interpreted this in different ways including requiring just cause for termination to prohibiting terminations made in bad faith or motivated by malice.[45]

Climate / Environment
Climate / Environment

Disability Rights
Disability Rights

Organizations
Organizations

The Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada (PLAN) http://www.planevada.org/

ACLU of Nevada https://www.aclunv.org/

Nevada Advocates http://nevadaadvocates.org/

Local News Sources
Local News Sources

Relevant City and County Information
Relevant City and County Information