Difference between revisions of "Oregon"

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Important bills proposed by Oregon lawmakers this legislative session that should be '''supported:'''
 
Important bills proposed by Oregon lawmakers this legislative session that should be '''supported:'''
 
*[https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2909/ '''HB 2909'''] would require candidates to release their tax returns from the past five years to appear on the state's ballot.<br>[[File:Billtracker.png | left | class=img-max-600 | 600px | link=https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2909/]]
 
*[https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2909/ '''HB 2909'''] would require candidates to release their tax returns from the past five years to appear on the state's ballot.<br>[[File:Billtracker.png | left | class=img-max-600 | 600px | link=https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2909/]]
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*[https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2673/ '''HB 2673'''] would simplify and streamline the procedure allowing transgender individuals to change their sex on their birth certificates.<br>[[File:Billtracker.png | left | class=img-max-600 | 600px | link=https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB2673/]]
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*[https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB3060/ '''HB 3060'''] would require businesses entering into contracts with the state that exceed 150,000 USD to have anti-discrimination policies protecting [[LGBTQ Equality | LGBTQ+ individuals]].<br>[[File:Billtracker.png | left | class=img-max-600 | 600px | link=https://openstates.org/or/bills/2017%20Regular%20Session/HB3060/]]
 
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Revision as of 17:34, 20 April 2017

Contents

Elected Officials
Ways to Resist



Updates
Updates

  • 03/02/2017: Two bakers who had to pay damages for refusing to prepare a cake for a same-sex wedding appealed the judgement in front of the Oregon Court of Appeals. The bakers seek a religious exemption to the 2007 Oregon Equality Act, which protects Oregonians from discrimination.[1]
  • 02/15/2017: State Representative Mike Nearman (R-Independence) and James Buchal, a Portland lawyer, are chief petitioners for a new ballot initiative, Initiative Petition 5, which would require every voter in Oregon to provide proof of citizenship when voting. If they reach 117,578 valid signatures, the measure will appear on the ballot in November 2018. The bill would require all Oregonians to re-register by providing state officials with proof of citizenship by 2020.[2]
  • 02/03/2017: Secretary of State Dennis Richardson, a Republican, created the "Fair Redistricting Task Force," which includes only one Democrat despite the fact that Democrats have the majority in the House (17-13) and Senate (35-25). The group also only has one minority and one woman.[3]

Cities Update

Actions Taken by the State Government
Actions Taken by the State Government

Legislative Actions

Legislation that Supports Equity and Justice
Important bills proposed by Oregon lawmakers this legislative session that should be supported:

  • HB 2909 would require candidates to release their tax returns from the past five years to appear on the state's ballot.
    Billtracker.png


  • HB 2673 would simplify and streamline the procedure allowing transgender individuals to change their sex on their birth certificates.
    Billtracker.png


  • HB 3060 would require businesses entering into contracts with the state that exceed 150,000 USD to have anti-discrimination policies protecting LGBTQ+ individuals.
    Billtracker.png



Harmful Legislation
Harmful bills proposed by Oregon lawmakers this legislative session that should be opposed:



See also the main policy pages for federal legislative tracking.

Executive / Administrative Actions

Key Upcoming Elections
Key Upcoming Elections

Click here to find out if you're registered to vote. Register to vote here. The deadline is 21 days before Election Day. Bring proof of identification the first time you vote. No document is required to vote.[4]

Federal Elections

State Elections

  • Governor Kate Brown (D) is up for reelection in 2018.[5]

Local Elections

Mayoral Elections

School Board Elections

Prosecutor Elections

Washington County

  • District Attorney Bob Hermann,[6] the most recent president emeritus of the state DA's association, jailed a rape victim on a material witness warrant while the accused was let out on bail.[7]
  • He also jailed Benito Vasquez-Hernandez, a poor Hispanic immigrant with no formal education and who appears to have very low mental competency, for more than 2.5 years on a material witness warrant.[8]
  • He also obtained a life sentence for a 13-year-old who he tried as an adult (though the Oregon Supreme Court reversed this),[9] opposed legal marijuana for people over 21 (he rhetorically lamented, "Will we need 'taste testers; in our schools and at our kids' birthday parties?"),[10] and did not fire an assistant district attorney who wrote on Facebook that “If you’re looking for a terrorist, look at a young Muslim male. If you’re looking for a gang shooter, look for a young black guy. If you’re looking for a child molester or a mass shooter, look for a white guy. That’s just common sense.”[11][12]
  • A 2017 Slate article identified DA Hermann as one of three prosecutors who perpetrate a racist, inhumane justice system in Oregon.[13]

Sheriff Elections

County Commissioners Elections

City Council Elections

Obamacare / link=
Healthcare

In Oregon, 7% of the population remains uninsured compared to a national average of 9%.[14] Oregon is a state that has expanded Medicaid coverage to more people as allowed under the ACA.[15]

ACA Repeal

  • Oregon would be one of the hardest hit in the case of a repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA): fifth highest in overall negative effect, fifth highest growth in uninsured population by 2019, fourth highest growth in uninsured population by 2021, fourth most potential jobs lost in 2019, and third highest potential economic impact between 2019 and 2023 due to loss of premium tax credits and Medicaid expansion.[16] The estimated job losses in 2019 are 45,000.[17]
  • If there is a full repeal of the ACA, 567,000 people in Oregon (or 14.1% of the population) are estimated to lose coverage, whereas 475,000 people (or 11.8% of the population) will lose coverage with a partial repeal. (Retrieved 1/29/2017 from ACA Repeal Impact, state-by-state.)
  • The number of uninsured people in Oregon is predicted to be 261,000 by 2021 under the ACA. Without the ACA, that number is expected to rise to 658,000, a 151.8% increase.[18]
  • Oregon, like most states, lost the ability to place lifetime limits on coverage, because that practice is banned by the ACA; those limits are likely to be reinstated under a full repeal.[19]
  • Given that a repeal of the ACA would also change payment structures and subsidies, 45,000 jobs could be lost in Oregon. When federal funding is cut, it creates a ripple effect that affects local and state revenue, thus creating losses in economic activity and employment.[20]
  • Under the ACA Repeal-and-Delay strategy, young adults in Oregon could pay $689 more in 2018.[21]

Policing
Policing

The Facts

  • 70 people were killed by the police in Oregon from 2013 to 2016, which is the 15th most per capita in the country.
  • Black people were killed at a rate 2.4 times higher than the rate for all people in Oregon.[22]

Immigration
Immigration

The Facts

  • In 2013, Oregon had 391,026 immigrants, making up 10% of the population.[23]
  • There are estimated to be 130,000 undocumented immigrants in Oregon, making up 3.2% of the population.[24]

Rights of Non-Citizens

  • Oregon does not allow undocumented immigrants to get drivers’ licenses.[25]
  • Oregon allows undocumented immigrants to attend public college at the same in-state tuition rate as legal residents and citizens.[26]
  • In 2012, President Barack Obama signed an executive order (DACA) that defers deportation for children who were brought to the country as children. The action allows them to work lawfully but does not create a pathway to citizenship or give them legal status in the United States. In Oregon, 18,407 individuals have benefited from this executive action.[27]

Deportation

The Facts

  • 8.6% of K-12 students in Oregon had undocumented parents in 2014.[28]
  • Undocumented immigrants in Oregon made up 4.8% of the labor workforce in 2014.[29]
  • If all undocumented workers were removed from Oregon, the state would lose $3.4 billion in economic activity.[30]
  • Undocumented immigrants paid $83.1 million in state and local taxes in Pennsylvania in 2012.[31]

Policy

  • Four bills based on Arizona’s SB 1070 (which requires police to check detained/arrested people's immigration status if it is suspected that they might not be in the US legally)[32] were introduced in 2011, but none passed.[33]

Sanctuary Policies

  • Most counties in Oregon have policies limiting police cooperation with federal immigration enforcement.[34]
  • Governor Kate Brown (D) has issued an executive order forbidding state agencies and employees from aiding with federal immigration enforcement.[35]
  • Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler has declared that the city will remain a sanctuary city.[36]
  • January 10, 2017, Beaverton declared sanctuary with a unanimous vote.
  • January 23, 2017, Forest Grove fails to pass sanctuary resolution [37]
  • March 7 2017, Hillsboro declares sanctuary in a close vote.

Refugee Resettlement

Voting Rights
Voting Rights

The Facts

  • Oregon permits online voter registration. As Oregon's elections are done by mail only, there is no need for absentee or early voting. Oregon voters must provide identification during the registration process or they will not be allowed to vote.[40]
  • Oregon’s pioneering of an automatic voter registration system has helped make the state a leader in voter registration.[41]

Mass Incarceration
Mass Incarceration

The Facts

  • In 2014, 20,690 people were incarcerated in Oregon, plus a probation population of 36,957 and parole population of 23,088.
  • Of the prison population, 807 people were serving life sentences, and 180 were serving life sentences without parole.
  • 1,086 juveniles were in custody in Oregon in 2013.
  • In Oregon, a black person was 5.6 times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person in 2014.
  • Oregon does not have private prisons.
  • Corrections expenditures in 2014 were $925 million.[42]

Benefits / Tax Cuts
Benefits / Tax Cuts

Income Tax

The Facts

  • Oregon residents who face a tax increase under Trump’s plan:[43]
    • Households: 95,000
    • Adults and children: 297,000
    • Children: 179,000

Policy

Public Benefits

The Facts

  • In 2015, an average of 442,090 households and 779,749 individuals received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits (SNAP, formerly called Food Stamps) in a given month in Oregon.[44] In 2011, approximately 20% of the population of Oregon was receiving SNAP benefits.[45] The average monthly benefit per Oregon household was $215 per household and $120 per person in 2016.[46]
  • In 2016, an average of 38,000 households, including 17,269 families and 27,394 children, received Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), which is direct financial assistance, in a given month.[47] The average monthly benefit for a single parent with three children residing in Oregon was $506 in 2014.[48] Average benefits in Oregon have fallen in value by 27.9% since 1996.[49]
  • In 2016, an average of 21,750 women received funds from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in a given month.[50]
  • In December 2015, there were 9,199 Social Security recipients in the "aged" category[51] who received $391.02 per person on average, for a total of $3,597,000.[52]

Housing/Infrastructure
Housing/Infrastructure

Housing

The Facts

  • 147,300 low-income households in Oregon spent more than half of their income on housing.[53]
  • In 2014, Oregon had 22 units of affordable and available housing for every 100 households categorized as “extremely low income” (at or below 30% of area median income.)[54]
  • In Oregon, there were 13,238 homeless people in 2016, which is 2.41% of the total national homeless population.[55]
  • Of the homeless population, there were 1,315 families, 1,341 veterans, 939 unaccompanied young adults (18-24), and 3460 people experiencing chronic homelessness.[56]
  • Oregon received $360 million in federal rental assistance funding in 2014.[57]
  • In Oregon, more than 56,000 families relied on federal rental assistance in 2014.[58]
  • Nearly all Oregon households using federal rental assistance included children, elderly people or disabled people.[59]

Policy

Infrastructure

The Facts

  • Oregon’s infrastructure received a score of C- from the American Society of Civil Engineers in 2010.[60]
  • This study gave the state “good” scores for inland waterways and solid waste, and identified aviation and water as being in “poor” condition.[61]
  • In 2013, the Department of Transportation found that 22.9% of Oregon’s bridges were structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, and 65% of Oregon’s roads were in poor or mediocre condition.[62]
  • Driving on these roads leads to an additional $173 per motorist per year in increased vehicle repairs and operating costs.[63]

Policy

Women's Rights/Reproductive Justice
Women's Rights/Reproductive Justice

Planned Parenthood

The Facts[64]

  • Oregon has 12 Planned Parenthood centers.
  • In 2015, 9 centers were in rural, medically underserved, or health provider shortage areas.
  • On average, there is one Planned Parenthood for 65,334 women of reproductive age.

Policy Solutions / Issues

Abortion

The Facts[65]

  • There were 27 abortion providers in Oregon in 2015.
  • In 2014, 7 out of every 1,000 women of reproductive age in Oregon had an abortion. The national abortion rate is 14.6.

Policy Solutions / Issues[66]
Oregon has no major restrictions on abortion access.

Women and Wages

The Facts[67]

  • In Oregon, 15.3% of women live in poverty. 38.8% of single mothers live in poverty, as do 8.5% of women age 65 and older.
  • For every dollar made by men, women are paid $0.81, which is one cent above the national average of $0.80.
  • African American women are paid $0.70 for every dollar paid to white men, while Latina women make $0.51 for every dollar made by white men.

Domestic Violence

The Facts[68]

  • Almost one-third of Oregon women reported experiencing some kind of domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, or physical assault.
  • In 2014, Oregon sexual and domestic violence services received 131,050 calls for help. 12,017 requests for shelter could not be met.
  • In 2013, 34 Oregonians were killed in 26 separate domestic violence incidents
  • In 2013, approximately 40% of Oregon counties saw at least one domestic violence homicide.

LGBTQ Issues / link=
LGBTQ+ Issues

Religious freedom law

Oregon does not currently have state religious freedom laws. Religious freedom laws protect people's right to practice their religion and limit laws imposing on that right, and were intended to protect religious minorities. However, after same-sex marriage was legalized, conservative states have attempted to enact similar laws with provisions that allow discrimination against LGBTQ+ individuals.[69]

Nondiscrimination laws

Oregon has nondiscrimination laws protecting LGBTQ+ people from discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, adoption, foster care, insurance, and jury selection.[70]

Parenting laws

Oregon lacks certain laws protecting LGBTQ people from discrimination in parenting, including surrogacy, parental presumption for same-sex couples, and consent to inseminate. Oregon does have protections in place for second-parent adoption, foster care, and de facto parent recognition.[71]

Hate crime laws

Oregon includes LGBTQ+ people in its hate crime laws as a protected group and requires reporting of hate crimes against LGBTQ+ people.[72]

Youth laws

Oregon has certain laws protecting LGBTQ+ youth, such as transgender inclusion in sports, protection from conversion therapy, and anti-bullying laws. It lacks laws to address LGBTQ+ youth homelessness, LGBTQ+ inclusive sex education laws, and LGBTQ+ inclusive juvenile justice policies.[73]

Health and safety laws

Oregon has certain nondiscrimination laws protecting the health and safety of its LGBTQ+ citizens, including nondiscrimination protections in the ACA exchanges, a ban on insurance exclusions for trans health care, trans-inclusive health benefits for state employees, and gender marker changes on identification documents.[74]

Educational Justice
Educational Justice

The Facts

  • Oregon is ranked 32nd in per-pupil spending as of 2013, with an average expenditure of $5,517 per student.[75]
  • As of 2013, Oregon ranked 14th in teacher pay, with teachers earning an average of $58,758 per year.[76]
  • 89% of students in Oregon attend public schools. As is the case in other states, students who attend private schools come from wealthier families, with private school families earning an average 57% higher income.[77]
  • As of 2014, public charter school enrollment accounted for 5.1% of total public school enrollment.[78]
  • Oregon's overall graduation rate is 72%, compared to the national average of 82%. 74% of White students, 65% of Hispanic students, 60% of Black students, and 83% of Asian/Pacific Islander students graduate from high school in four years. All of these graduation rates are significantly lower than the national average.[79]

Consumer Protections /Worker's Rights
Consumer Protections/Workers' Rights

The Facts

  • Oregon has a state minimum wage, which is higher in the Portland Metro Area ($11.25) than in nonurban counties ($10.00). These minimum wages will increase each year until 2023.
    • 2018: Portland Metro Area $12, nonurban counties $10.50
    • 2019: Portland Metro Area $12.50, nonurban counties $11
    • 2020: Portland Metro Area $13.25, nonurban counties $11.50
    • 2021: Portland Metro Area $14, nonurban counties $12
    • 2022: Portland Metro Area $14.75, nonurban counties $12.50[80]
  • Oregon has a state law for paid sick leave that aligns with Portland's law, in which employees earn one hour of sick leave for every 30 hours worked.[81]
  • Oregon has no state law for paid family leave.[82]

Policies

  • Oregon is a state with no Right-to-Work laws, which means that the state can not prohibit unions that collectively bargain on behalf of both members and nonmembers from requiring union fees for the services they provide to all workers they represent. Such laws are designed to reduce unions' income and power.[83]
  • Oregon is a state with an at-will exemption.[84] "At-will" means that an employer can terminate an employee at any time for any reason, except an illegal one, or for no reason, without breaking the law.[85] Likewise, an employee is free to leave a job at any time for any or no reason with no adverse legal consequences.[86]
  • Oregon also has a public policy exemption,[87] meaning that an employer may not fire an employee if it would violate the state's public policy doctrine or a state or federal statute, including refusing to perform an act that state law prohibits (e.g., refusing an employer's request to commit perjury at a trial), reporting a violation of the law (e.g., reporting an employer's fraudulent accounting practices or use of child labor), engaging in acts that are in the public interest (e.g., joining the National Guard or performing jury duty) and exercising a statutory right (e.g., filing a claim under the state workers' compensation law).[88]
  • Oregon does allow for implied contract exemptions.[89]. An implied contract can be created in several different ways: oral assurances by a supervisor; or handbooks, policies or practices as written assurances by the employer. This means that if there is no written contract between the employer and employee, that employee may have an exception of fixed term or even indefinite employment based on an employer's statements.[90] As a general rule, courts disregard language promising long-term, lifetime or permanent employment as aspirational and consider the relationship to be at-will.[91]
  • Oregon does not support the Implied Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing.[92] Courts have interpreted the covenant in different ways, from requiring just cause for termination to prohibiting terminations made in bad faith or motivated by malice.[93]

Climate / Environment
Climate / Environment

The Facts

  • About 75% of Oregon’s electricity generation is from renewable sources, mostly hydroelectric.[94]
  • Oregon has 13 sites on the National Priorities List.[95]
  • Approximately 53% of Oregon’s land is federally owned.[96]
  • In 2014, the Black population had the highest air pollution exposure indices—of 87 to an overall index of 62 and a White index of 59.[97]
  • In 2012, Native American adults in Oregon were most likely to have asthma—12.6%, compared to 10.1% overall.[98]

Policies

  • The environmental agency in Oregon is the Department of Environmental Quality.
  • Oregon created climate action plans in 2004, 2008 and 2010.[99] The city of Portland created its own climate action plan in 2015.[100]
  • In 2016, Gov. Kate Brown signed a law increasing the renewable portfolio standard to 50% by 2040, including the total phaseout of coal-fired electricity from Oregon energy sources by 2035.[101]

Disability Rights
Disability Rights

The Facts

  • Oregon has the 9th-highest percentage of disabled people in America: 15.2% of Oregon’s residents are disabled, compared with the national average of 12.6%. [2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table R1810]
  • Oregonians with disabilities have the 21st-highest employment rate in the country, at 37.8%, compared to the national average of 34.9%. [2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table R1811] People without disabilities in Oregon have a 76.2% employment rate. [2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table B18120]
  • Approximately 19.1% of eligible voters in Oregon have one or more disabilities, compared to a national average of 15.71%.[102]
  • Of adults with disabilities in Oregon, 30.6% live in poverty, as opposed to 13.2% of non-disabled adults. [2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table B23024] The poverty rate for disabled children under 5 is 34.0%, as opposed to 22.7% for non-disabled children. [2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table B18130]
  • In Oregon, 5.1% of adults between 18 and 64 receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income), compared to the national average of 5.4%.[2015 US Census American Community Survey, Table B19056]

Organizations
Organizations and Events

Find state/local chapters of national organizations here.

Statewide

  • ACLU of Oregon: The Oregon Affiliate of the ACLU is a nonpartisan organization dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of civil liberties and civil rights.
  • Basic Rights Oregon: Fights for LGBTQ+ and racial justice.
  • Causa Oregon works to improve the lives of Latino immigrants and their families in Oregon through advocacy, coalition building, leadership development, and civic engagement. Latino immigrants and their families are the heart of Causa and inspire, implement, and champion our work.
  • League of Women Voters of Oregon: A grassroots, nonpartisan political nonprofit organization that encourages informed and active participation in government in order to build better communities statewide.
  • The Oregon Coalition Against Hate Crime (CAHC) works on three primary levels: connecting community groups with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies to improve the reporting of hate crimes and to aid in the investigation of hate crimes; providing resources to victims of hate crimes and hate incidents, including information on neighborhood mediation and proper legal channels to report hate crimes; and educating the community about the disruptive nature of hate crimes and the community strengthening value of diversity.
  • Oregon Progressive Network
  • Rural Organizing Project: Advancing democracy and advocating for human rights in rural Oregon.
  • Western States Center: "Movement Building in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain Northwest region"

Portland

  • Bernie PDX: Originally focused on supporting the Bernie Sanders Campaign, Bernie PDX has become a hub for progressive activism and social justice.
  • Black Lives Matter Portland—the Portland chapter of Black Lives Matter.
  • Black Rose Portland: The Portland Local for the Black Rose Anarchist Federation.
  • The Bus Project: "We're Oregon's next generation, doing democracy right. We're building a great future and empowering great people (like you) to lead it. We're grassroots, nonpartisan and all about organizing Oregonians, face-to-face. We give people their first taste of delicious democracy, develop new leaders and use person-to-person politics to move Oregon forward. Not just left or right, but forward."
  • Don't Shoot Portland
  • Jobs with Justice "believes that all workers should have collective bargaining rights, employment security, and a decent standard of living within an economy that works for everyone. We bring together labor, community, student, and faith voices at the national and local levels to win improvements in people’s lives and shape the public discourse on workers’ rights and the economy."
  • Portland Assembly: "We believe in embracing and encouraging an active citizenry through the development of direct democracy."
  • Portland Human Rights Commission works to eliminate discrimination and bigotry, to strengthen inter-group relationships, and to foster greater understanding, inclusion and justice for those who live, work, study, worship, travel and play in the City of Portland. In doing so, the Commission is guided by the principles embodied in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  • Portland's Resistance: "Our resistance envisions a future where communities are empowered to create new solutions to present day problems, using direct action, political advocacy, and community development to inspire new people to get involved in politics and to create a united platform for progressive causes. Portland has an opportunity to become a beacon of light, modeling to the world what a nonviolent resistance movement can truly look like."
  • Standing Up for Racial Justice Portland: SURJ PDX is a Portland-based group focused on educating, organizing and mobilizing white people to work for racial justice.
  • Trans Pride PDX: "Ensuring equal rights and improving the quality of life for all transgender LGBTQIA Oregonian peers and members statewide and nationally through legal and policy advocacy, peer support, and social justice organizing.”
  • YWCA Portland: The YWCA of Greater Portland provides life-changing services for women.

Eugene

  • Our Revolution Lane County is "a grassroots organization seeking to engage, educate, and activate the community. Our dedicated volunteers work tirelessly for the political revolution necessary to bring about positive change for the people in our local, state, and national governments. A chapter of Our Revolution."
  • Eugene/Springfield Solidarity Network Resistance Training is presenting an intense series of classes designed by worldwide activists with decades of experience in resisting authoritarian regimes. We will be presenting the best tools for nonviolent direct action organizing, including strategy, group dynamics and structure so local activists and new leaders can resist the growing fascism in the federal government and our local community."
  • SURJ (Showing up for Racial Justice)—the Eugene/Springfield chapter of the [www.showingupforracialjustice.org national organization. SURJ focuses on getting white people mobilized to combat racism and white privilege. The Eugene/Springfield chapter meets the first Thursday of the month and organizes events and partners with other local groups, such as CALC and NAACP, around racism and social justice. For more information, email them at surj-info@googlegroups.com; you can also request to be added to their mailing list.

Salem


State and Local Disability Rights Organizations


Environmental Justice Groups

Event Calendars

Local News Sources
Local News Sources

Statewide

Portland

Other Cities

Relevant City and County Information
Relevant City and County Information

Portland

Portland, Oregon, has a documented history of racism and discrimination, from the cities' refusal to provide aid following the flooding of Vanport, the main black community, in 1948[103], to the persistent racial disparities in policing, education, and housing that exist today. Still troubled by its racist past, Portland is home to dozens of organizations, websites, and movements in support of the fight for equity.

Issues

Policing

The Facts

The Portland Police Department has been found to have issues with police violence, particularly against people of color, as demonstrated by the following statistics:

  • Portland police killed 8 people from 2013 to 2016.[104]

Racial Disparities

  • Traffic stops: Portland police were more likely to stop Portlanders of color for equipment violations and license violations than white Portlanders. [105]
  • Pedestrian stops: Black Portlanders were only 6.3% of the population but 11.8% of police pedestrian stops.[106]
  • Police searches: Portland police were more likely to search Portlanders of color than white Portlanders. Black citizens had the highest rate of searches and weapon pat-downs by police, despite data showing that white Portlanders were most likely to be found with illegal items when searched.[107]
  • Portland Police Bureau Staffing Disparities: The Portland Police Bureau has only 13% officers of color, while the minority population is 28%.[108]
  • In 2012, the City of Portland was brought to court by the United States due to use of force, primarily against people with mental illnesses. The settlement reached demanded an increase in officer training, officer accountability, and crisis prevention, a minimization of use of force, and an increase in community engagement.[109]

Policy

Following a series of incidents of police violence, former Mayor Charlie Hales announced his support for requiring officers to wear body cameras. Yet he allowed for a policy that allows officers to review the camera’s footage in most cases, allowing them to shape a testimony that undermines other witnesses’ testimonies.[110] This led to a series of protests, which were further exacerbated after he moved the negotiations to a private room after unsuccessfully trying to ban protesters from the building.

Poverty

Over the last 20 years, majority low-income and black areas like Albina and North Portland have gentrified, pushing these citizens out east into what is now called “the numbers.” This has caused a lot of disparity in housing, economics, and education.

The Facts

  • Black people are only 7% of Multnomah County's population but 19% of those in Multnomah County emergency homeless shelters.[111]
  • The poverty rate among black children in Portland is nearly 50%, compared to 13% for white children.[112]
  • In Multnomah County, fewer than 1 in 3 black households own their homes, compared to the ~60% of white households in Multnomah County who do.[113]
  • A 2011 study by the City of Portland found that discrimination by landlords and leasing agents was found in 64% of 50 tests across the city.[114]
  • A 2015 study by the Portland Public Schools found that 15% of Black and Native American students have been suspended at least once, compared to the 4% of White students who have been suspended.[115]
  • An Oregon Public Health Institute found that Black and Hispanic populations have higher risks for carbon monoxide poisoning than non–Black/Hispanic populations, due to housing disparities.[116]

Policy

  • In 2015, the City of Portland pledged to spend $32 million on affordable housing in North Portland, in the Interstate Corridor. This initiative, together with SOULDistrictPDX, is working to empower black citizens and business in Portland.[117]
  • The Portland City Council adopted a law in 2016 that required developments with 20+ units to reserve 20% for households at 80% of the Area Median income, and that provided incentive for developers to create more affordable units for families with 60% of the Area Median Income.[118]
  • With money from a 2016 affordable-housing bond,[119] the City of Portland acquired 263 units of a privately owned apartment building to provide affordable housing to families making less than 60% of the Area median Income, which is $43,000 for a family of four.[120]

Beaverton

Elected Officials

Beaverton has a strong mayor–council government.
Mayor: Denny Doyle

Term expires 2020

Councilor Position 1: Lacey Beaty

Term expires December 2018

Councilor Position 2: Betty Bode

Term expires December 2018

Councilor Position 3: Mark Fagin

Term expires December 2020

Councilor Position 4: Cate Arnold

Term expires December 2020

Councilor Position 5: Marc San Soucie

Term expires December 2018


Beaverton School Board
The Beaverton School Board has seven elected, volunteer community members who serve four-year terms.[121] Zone 1: Susan Greenberg

Term expires 6/30/2017

Zone 2: Anne Bryan

Term expires 6/30/2017

Zone 3: ​Eric Simpson

Term expires 6/30/2019

Zone 4: Donna Tyner

Term expires 6/30/2017

Zone 5: LeeAnn Larsen

Term expires 6/30/2017

Zone 6: Becky Tymchuk

Term expires 6/30/2019

Zone 7: Linda Degman

Term expires 6/30/2019

Issues

Immigration
  • Almost 1 in 4 Beaverton residents were born outside the US, and 1 in 3 people living in the city identify as a person of color.[122] There are 101 different primary languages spoken at the homes of Beaverton School District Students.[123]
  • On January 10, 2017, the City Council unanimously declared Beaverton a sanctuary city.[124]
Policing
Organizations

Beaverton Social Justice League

BOLD Program

Salem

Like most of the state, Salem's population lacks ethnic diversity, with 78% white residents.[129] To its credit, Salem has an active neighborhood association system, engaged business community, and citywide commitment to service and volunteerism.

Poverty and homelessness

  • Among Salem's primary issues, poverty ranks at the top. More than 18% of residents are living at or below the poverty line. However, the poverty rate for enrolled K-12 students is much higher, at 61%.[130]
  • Homelessness is a significant problem in Salem, with several homeless camps around the city. The 2015 Homeless Count reported 765 people without shelter on a single night.[131]

Prison system

The Salem area is home to five of the state's prisons, which have the capacity to house more than 5,800 inmates.[132] Families relocate to Salem to be close to a loved one who is serving his or her sentence. These residents, with an unemployed, imprisoned family member, sometimes have greater economic needs.

Lake Oswego

Lake Oswego has a 0.7% Black or African American population, and 89.3% White population.[133] Consequentially, Lake Oswego has had trouble with racism within its schools in the previous years, including:

  • In 2001, a school basketball coach insisted upon calling a Persian student "Bin Laden" freshly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, but he was not reprimanded until 2015.[134]
  • In 2012, six white football players at Lake Oswego High School cyberbullied a black football player on their team with racist tweets from a Twitter account called "Lake NoNegro" and from another that impersonated a vice principal. They were suspended, and the bullied student later changed schools.[135].
  • In 2015 and 2016, there were two similar anti-black and anti-Semitic incidents at this same school.[136]
  • In 2017, after the school newspaper addressed the blatant racism at their school in a front-page article, three men's bathrooms were defaced with several racial slurs.[137]

Washington County

Elected Officials

Washington County is structured as a Council–Manager form of government, giving the five-member Board of Commissioners legislative responsibility and designating administrative authority to a Board-appointed professional county administrator. The Commissioners also serve as the governing board for Clean Water Services.

Commissioner At-Large, Chair: Andy Duyck

Term: January 2015—December 2018

Commissioner District 1: Dick Schouten

Term: January 2017—December 2020

Commissioner District 2: Greg Malinowski

Term: January 2015—December 2018

Commissioner District 3: Roy Rogers

Term:

Commissioner District 4: Bob Terry

Term: January 2015—December 2018

District map


District Attorney: Bob Hermann

Term expires:

Sheriff: Pat Garrett

Term expires:

Immigration

Washington County has the largest Latino population in Oregon, according to census data from 2000.

Policing

  • On October 3, 2015, Phyllis Ilene Jepsen was shot and killed by Washington County deputies.[138]
  • On January 2, 2015, Lewis Lee Lembke was shot and killed by Washington County deputies.[139]

Organizations

Criminal Justice League- Challenging nefarious incumbents in Washington County.

Unite Oregon—Washington County Chapter

WashCo Solidarity

Washington County Educate and Organize

Washington County Human Rights Council

Cornelius

Elected Officials

The City of Cornelius, Oregon, operates by charter, under a Council–Manager form of Government. Cornelius has an elected Mayor and four Councilors who guide the City and legislate Ordinances. The City is administered by a City Manager, who is appointed by the Council.[140]

Mayor: Jeffrey C. Dalin

Term expires:

Councilor: Harley Crowder

Terms expires: December 2018

Councilor: Jose Orozco

Terms expires: December 2018

Councilor: Steven Heinrich

Terms expires:

Councilor: Dave Schamp

Terms expires:

Forest Grove

Elected Officials

The City Council consists of a Mayor and six Councilors nominated and elected from the City at large. The Mayor and City Councilors serve four-year terms of office. The Mayor and City Councilors all serve the citizens of the community in a volunteer capacity.

Mayor: Peter B. Truax


Term Expires 11/2018

Councilor Tom Johnston

Term Expires 11/2018

Councilor Timothy A. Rippe

Term Expires 11/2020

Councilor Ron Thompson

Term Expires 11/2018

Councilor Elena Uhing

Term Expires 11/2020

Councilor Matthew Vandehey

Term Expires 11/2020

Councilor Malynda Wenzl

Term Expires 11/2018

Immigration

On January 23, 2017, Forest Grove city council voted on declaring to be a sanctuary city. The measure failed with a 3-3 vote.[141] Audio file of testimony

Hillsboro

Elected Officials

Hillsboro operates under a Councilor/City Manager form of government. Voters elect six Councilors and a Mayor. Each serves a four-year term, subject to a charter-imposed limitation of two consecutive terms. The Mayor and Council appoint a City Manager to conduct the business of the City. Policy decisions are the responsibility of the Council and Mayor. Administrative functions are carried out by the City Manager and manager-appointed staff.[142]

Mayor: Steve Callaway

Term expires January 2021

Council Ward 1, Position A: Darell Lumaco

Term expires January 2019

Council Ward 1, Position B: Rick Van Beveren

Term expires January 2021

Council Ward 2, Position A: Kyle Allen

Term expires January 2019

Council Ward 2, Position B: Anthony Martin

Term expires January 2021

Council Ward 3, Position A: VACANT

Term expires

Council Ward 3, Position B: Fred Nachtigal

Term expires January 2021

Hillsboro School Board
The Hillsboro School District Board of Directors is comprised of seven elected members serving four-year terms. Board members are community volunteers and do not receive compensation for their work. Board members establish policy based on Oregon and Federal laws governing schools. The Board approves policies for the Superintendent to implement.[143]

Position 1: Janeen Sollman

Term expires 2017

Position 2: Glenn Miller

Term expires 2017

Position 3: Monte Akers

Term expires 2017

Position 4: Kim Strelchun

Term expires 2019

Position 5: Lisa Allen

Term expires 2019

Position 6: Erik Seligman

Term expires 2017

Position 7: Wayne Clift

Term expires 2017

Women's Rights / Reproductive Justice

On May 24, 2016, Hillsboro school board voted 4–3 to reject contraceptives in high school.[144]

Sherwood

Elected Officials

Sherwood's City Council is made up of a Mayor and six Councilor positions, including that of Council President. The Mayor presides over Council meetings, and, in the Mayor's absence, the Council President may substitute in the performance of mayoral duties. The Council members are elected for four-year terms of office through a general election, except when a position is vacated before term completion and filled by special appointment of the Council. The Mayor is elected to a two-year term. The Council is governed by Sherwood City Charter and adopted Council Rules.[145]

Mayor: Krisanna Clark

Term expires: January 2019

Councilor: Jennifer Harris

Term expires: January 2019

Councilor: Dan King

Term expires: January 2021

Councilor: Sally Robinson

Term expires: January 2019

Councilor: Jennifer Kuiper

Term expires: January 2019

Councilor: Kim Young

Term expires: January 2021

Councilor: Sean Garland

Term expires: January 2021

Tigard

Elected Officials

Mayor: John L. Cook

Term Expires December 2018

Councilor: Jason Snider

Term Expires December 2020

Councilor: John Goodhouse

Term Expires December 2018

Councilor: Tom Anderson

Term Expires December 2020

Councilor: Marc Woodard

Term Expires December 2018